Satisfying curiosity at the expense of the state? Lessons from the British state’s involvement in technological innovation

Elio di Muccio (PhD researcher in POLSIS)

4-6pm, Wednesday 26th October 2016, 417 Muirhead Tower

University of Birmingham

All welcome.

It has always been mainstream to think about technology in isolation from society. Despite strong arguments to the contrary, relatively little has been said to critique the activity of public authority in this sphere. Therefore, there are less visible aspects of the struggle over technology that dissenting voices should know about. In this respect, the case of the state’s programme of industrial reorganisation in late-1960s Britain presents social movements with interesting and unavoidable political challenges. As I will illustrate, these lie well beyond the traditional ones of surveillance, security and digital democracy. I hope to spark some discussion about how we may begin to meet these challenges head on.

About Elio:

I have lived in Southern Italy and New York City before joining the University of Birmingham as an undergraduate student in 2009. I have lived in South Birmingham since. I am interested in the social, economic and political implications of techno-scientific innovation. In particular, I am interested in developing our understanding of the changing relationship between technology and the state beyond the notions of democratic engagement and electoral participation. Through this, I hope to make a small but detailed and targeted contribution to a growing interdisciplinary body of knowledge about the relationship between technology and society.

Elio quote.jpg

 

 Poster:

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